Niners GM Lynch: Anthem protests 'divisive'

Niners GM Lynch: Anthem protests 'divisive'

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — While every member of the 49ers stood for the national anthem before last week’s preseason opener, that didn’t prevent other players around the league from continuing the silent protest that originated in the San Francisco Bay Area a year ago.

Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett and Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch sat during the anthem before their respective preseason openers, and Bennett later confirmed he sat in protest. Lynch has yet to comment on sitting.

Despite HR, Judge sets dubious strikeout mark

Despite HR, Judge sets dubious strikeout mark

Given that he hit a 457-foot home run into the third deck in left field, New York Yankees right fielder Aaron Judge was undaunted that he also set the major league record for consecutive games with a strikeout by a position player.

Judge whiffed in the ninth inning against New York Mets reliever Erik Goeddel, giving him a strikeout in 33 straight games, breaking the single-season mark set by Adam Dunn in 2012, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

Judge smiled when a reporter brought up that he had set the mark, not long after giving a simple “no” when another writer asked if strikeouts bother him.

“Was I aware [of the record]?” Judge said with a grin. “I was told before the game that I tied the record. I think you just informed me that I broke the record, so thank you. There’s nothing I can really say.”

Judge was a little more serious in evaluating his strikeout penchant in greater detail.

“There are some great pitchers in this league,” Judge said. “You’re going to get fooled sometimes. They’re going to get you. If I keep taking my good swings, swing at the right pitches, good things will happen.”

Judge is two games shy of the record for consecutive games with a strikeout for any player — 35, set by Montreal Expos pitcher Bill Stoneman in 1971.

'Dude, you are in Manhattan': Yankees rookies ride the subway — and get completely lost

'Dude, you are in Manhattan': Yankees rookies ride the subway — and get completely lost

NEW YORK — The New York Yankees are playing in the Subway Series, but that doesn’t mean they’ve mastered the subway.

For some of them, the subway is like a 98 mph fastball that rides high and tight. In this so-called “Summer of Hell” for New York City public transit, where commuters around the metropolitan area have been beset by all kinds of issues making it to work, the Bronx Bombers have been no different.

Mostly, it’s the rookies — those 20-something NYC newbies — who’ve had trouble navigating the B, D and 4 trains to Yankee Stadium.

Take, for instance, Tyler Wade, the 22-year-old utility man from Southern California, who wanted to take the subway on his first day as a big leaguer in early July. Like most of the Yankees who could be shipped back to Triple-A any day, Wade was staying at a midtown hotel.

“I ask these two cops, ‘Where is Yankee Stadium?’ One of them was like, ‘Dude, you are in Manhattan.'”

Tyler Wade</cite>

Wade downloaded a transit app, thinking he’d be all set. But he had no service once he was inside the Columbus Circle station and even less of a clue how to navigate the subway map. He tried to listen to the muffled announcements, but they didn’t help much. Eventually, he figured out how to hop on a D train headed north to the Bronx. If only it were that simple.

Wade exited at 155th Street, thinking he was just blocks away. But there was one issue — he was still in Manhattan.

“I get out and I see two cops and I’m like, ‘The Bronx doesn’t have big buildings,'” Wade said. “I ask these two cops, ‘Where is Yankee Stadium?’ One of them was like, ‘Dude, you are in Manhattan.'”

While rookies like Wade wander aimlessly around town, many of the veteran Yankees have moved outside the five boroughs. The New York City-bred Dellin Betances lives just over the George Washington Bridge, 10 minutes by car from Yankee Stadium. He said none of his teammates have asked for his advice about the MTA.

“I haven’t taken the subway in a long time, but I’m willing to help if they need the help,” Betances said.

Ace Luis Severino doesn’t need help with the train, but he could use a carpool. Severino drives to the city from New Rochelle in his Mazda CX-9, which he’s using this season as the perk of a sponsorship deal. Still, just like a typical 23-year-old, he doesn’t always have access to the car.

“Sometimes my wife takes my car, so I take an Uber,” said Severino, who added that he pays about $40 to take the ride-sharing service to Yankee Stadium.

Rookie Jordan Montgomery, 24, lives in the city and takes the subway every day. But the lefty from South Carolina became a seasoned straphanger the hard way. His first time using the train, he hopped on the 5 instead of the 4. A subtle difference, but when he got out in the Bronx, he was completely lost. The 5 train doesn’t stop at Yankee Stadium.

“I was walking around and was like, ‘What’s going on?'” Montgomery said. “I didn’t realize how far away I was, so I was walking around a little bit and then I got a taxi. I really had to lock in after that.”

Now he has it down to a science.

Rookie Caleb Smith, 26, the Yankees’ fifth starter for a time, also had a learning curve. Smith tried to take the subway when he first got called up. The Texan waited for 30 minutes on the platform before asking someone, “Is this the right way to get to Yankee Stadium?” The guy told him, no, he needed to go to the other side. So he crossed over to the opposite track — where he was told, again, he was in the wrong place.

“I did it four times,” Smith said. “I was finally like, ‘I’m just going to get an Uber.'”

Smith was making the prorated league minimum of $535,000, but since it was just a short-term salary, he preferred paying $2.75 for a subway ride instead of ordering up a car.

“Uber is too expensive,” Smith said.

With the help of reliever Chad Green, Smith learned how to navigate the subway before he was demoted to Scranton.

Wade, meanwhile, is still with the big league club, but he won’t be taking the subway to the Subway Series. Wade likes to be the first to the ballpark so he can get his work done early and stay out of the veterans’ way. He, too, has turned to Uber.

“I’m a guy that likes to feel comfortable,” Wade said, “and I feel like an Uber makes me less stressed.”

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'Dude, you are in Manhattan': Yankees rookies ride the subway — and get completely lost
'Dude, you are in Manhattan': Yankees rookies ride the subway — and get completely lost
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Source: ESPN SPORTS

'Titanic' Stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet Together in Saint-Tropez

'Titanic' Stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet Together in Saint-Tropez

Leonardo DiCaprio & Kate WinsletJack and Rose ReunitedAt French Villa

8/16/2017 4:44 PM PDT

Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet will always be linked whether they’re near, far or wherever they are … but it’s always best to see them together.

The famous “Titanic” couple hung out at Leo’s villa in Saint-Tropez, France in late July … and the 2 are clearly still very tight.

Kate was visiting to attend the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation annual charity gala, but the old friends and fellow Oscar-winners found some time to chill by the pool and catch up.

And our hearts will go on.

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'Titanic' Stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet Together in Saint-Tropez
'Titanic' Stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet Together in Saint-Tropez
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Source: TMZ

Amar'e Stoudemire, Black Jew, Comments On KKK and Neo-Nazis

Amar'e Stoudemire, Black Jew, Comments On KKK and Neo-Nazis

Amar’e StoudemireOn KKK and Neo-Nazis(Thoughts from a Black Jew)

8/16/2017 4:18 PM PDT

EXCLUSIVE

If there’s a guy the KKK should REALLY hate, it’s Amar’e Stoudemire — who checks 2 of their “most hated” boxes … black and Jewish. 

So, when we saw the former NBA superstar out in L.A. today, we had to ask for his thoughts on the situation in Charlottesville. 

“Don’t worry about things you can’t control,” Amar’e told our photog. 

And when our guy (a fellow Jew) expressed concern about the anti-Semitic groups, Stoudemire offered up this advice — “Stay strong, brother.”

FYI — Amar’e celebrates the Jewish holidays and moved to Israel to play basketball. 

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Amar'e Stoudemire, Black Jew, Comments On KKK and Neo-Nazis
Amar'e Stoudemire, Black Jew, Comments On KKK and Neo-Nazis
{$excerpt:n}
Source: TMZ

Clark apologizes to Seahawks, Ifedi for fight

Clark apologizes to Seahawks, Ifedi for fight

RENTON, Wash. — Seattle Seahawks defensive end Frank Clark said he apologized to Germain Ifedi and the rest of his teammates after punching Ifedi in the face and getting kicked out of practice earlier this month.

“It was a heat of the moment thing,” Clark said. “I let my emotions overcome the situation. For a brief moment, I thought that myself, that I was bigger than the team in all regards. I thought about myself first before I thought about my defense as a whole and my defensive line, to be more specific. Because it was a one-on-one drill. And that was basically it. It was an overheated thing. We always get heated up. It’s O-Line, D-Line. It’s supposed to happen. But it just got taken too far.”

“I just wanted to let them know that I was actually sorry. And I wanted to let Germain know that I was sorry, besides the team. … I just wanted to let him know that it was my fault and that it would never get to that point again.”

Frank Clark, on his apology to the Seahawks and teammate Germain Ifedi</cite>

During an Aug. 3 practice, Ifedi was jawing with defensive players when Clark punched him. Ifedi wasn’t wearing a helmet at the time, and the punch knocked him to the ground. Pete Carroll ejected Clark from practice, and Ifedi missed three days of work because of the injury.

Carroll held Clark out of practice the day after the fight to discipline him. Clark missed additional days because of an MCL sprain in his knee.

Clark said he has apologized to Ifedi individually.

“The biggest message was just letting them know how remorseful I was,” Clark said. “I just wanted to let them know that I was actually sorry. And I wanted to let Germain know that I was sorry, besides the team. That was my biggest thing. I just wanted to let him know that it was my fault and that it would never get to that point again. I’m sure things are going to get heated again. It’s football. It’s the offensive line and defensive line. But you’ve got to be aware of those situations and know how to take the actions out another kind of way.”

In addition to meeting with Carroll, Clark said he also heard from general manager John Schneider.

“John Schneider came up to me and said, ‘Do we have to have another one of those conversations?’ And the first thing I said was, ‘No,'” Clark said. “Because three years in, I understand what it takes to be a part of this team and what it takes to be a part of the NFL.”

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Clark apologizes to Seahawks, Ifedi for fight
Clark apologizes to Seahawks, Ifedi for fight
{$excerpt:n}
Source: ESPN SPORTS